Mike McInnerney

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Performing along with Duncan Chapman on 12th July 2018.

Mike McInerney plays shakuhachi and piano. Has studied mathematics and music at the University of York and has a Ph. D from Dartington College of Arts. He works with interactive technology, computer-generated sounds and live processing to create new music for Japanese shakuhachi flute, and other instruments. Mike has studied with the composer Frank Denyer, the shakuhachi player Yoshikazu Iwamoto, the pianist Jo Peach M. Phil. B. Mus LRAM, and the enlightened Zen calligraphy master, Tanchu Terayama.

 

 

 

 

Richard Craig

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Hailing from Clydebank, Scotland, Richard Craig has come to establish himself as one of the leading performers of new music. He has performed alongside ensembles such as MusikFabrik Köln, Klangforum Wien, and as a soloist he has been the dedicatee of many works for flute. As a composer/improviser he has been involved in an ongoing project with feedback called AMP/AL. His discography includes two monographs (INWARD and VALE both released on the métier label), and he has performed in numerous radio broadcasts for the BBC, WDR Köln, YLE Finland, Radio France, Radio Nacional de España, Swedish Radio, ARTE and Icelandic RUV. His own music is available on bandcamp.

From 2009-11 he was a Visiting Fellow in Performance at Aberdeen University, and since 2014, an Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Huddersfield. In 2015 Richard was appointed Head of Performance at Bangor University.
A recent performance, to whet your appetite:

 

 

The Sound Projector

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Very interesting review from the mighty Ed Pinsent of the last Listen to the Voice of Fire. See here:  http://www.thesoundprojector.com/2018/03/17/heat-light-and-fire/

Insightful comments regarding the split of noisy to introspective in the program as well as the reckoning of the (over) long AV piece, spell  binding but whatever happened to agreed fifteen minutes, some imbalance perhaps.

Ed came all the way up to back of beyond Aberystwyth, well as did many of you, and suffered the regular as clockwork hitches on Arriva Trains Wales.  But, what a pleasant fellow and we all enjoyed the Light of Asia on the night before. Great company and surprisingly tasty food.

Ahh, let’s do it all again…

 

Toshimaru Nakamura

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Toshimaru Nakamura is probably one of the most important electronic composers of the 21st century. His instrument is the no-input mixing board, which describes a way of using a standard mixing board as an electronic music instrument, producing sound without any external audio input. The use of the mixing board in this manner is not only innovative in that the sounds it can create but, more importantly, in the approach this method of working with the mixer demands. The unpredictability of the instrument requires an attitude of obedience and resignation to the system and the sounds it produces, bringing a high level of indeterminacy and surprise to the music. Nakamura pioneered this approach to the use of the mixing board in the mid-1990’s and has since then appeared on over one hundred audio publications, including nine solo CD’s.
He has performed throughout Europe, North America, Argentina, New Zealand, Australia, Korea, China, Singapore and Malaysia, performing and recording both as a soloist and in collaboration with numerous other musicians.
As an active organizer of concerts in Tokyo, Nakamura has helped many musicians coming to Japan find places to perform, both with himself and with others. From 1998 to 2003 Nakamura and Tetuzi Akiyama ran the concert series Improvisation Series at Bar Aoyama and then later the Meeting at Off Site series of concerts. Both these concert series were crucially important in exposing a new manner to improvised music (referred to as Electro Acoustic Improvisation) to the Japanese public and to foreign musicians visiting Japan, making Tokyo one of the global hotspots for this new approach to music.
 
This is a rare opportunity to listen to an exciting blend of leading experimental musicians from Japan, Berlin and Wales. Also  playing:  Arai Tatsuru, Rhodri Davies, Jenn Kirby, Dafydd Roberts & Andrew Leslie Hooker.

Rhodri Davies

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Rhodri Davies was born in 1971 and lives in Swansea, South Wales. He plays harp, electric harp, live-electronics and builds wind, water, ice, dry ice and fire harp installations. He has released four solo albums: Trem, Over Shadows, Wound Response and An Air Swept Clean of All Distance. His regular groups include: HEN OGLEDD, Cranc, a duo with John Butcher, The Sealed Knot, Common Objects and a trio with John Tilbury and Michael Duch. He has worked with the following artists: David Sylvian, Jenny Hval, Derek Bailey, Mark Fell, Kahimi Karie, Laura Cannell, Lina Lapelyte, Sachiko M, Bill Orcutt, Jim O’Rourke, Christian Marclay and David Toop.
 
In 2008 he collaborated with the visual artist Gustav Metzger on ‘Self-cancellation’, a large-scale audio-visual collaboration in London and Glasgow. New pieces for solo harp have been composed for him by: Eliane Radigue, Philip Corner, Phill Niblock, Ben Patterson, Christian Wolff, Alison Knowles, Mieko Shiomi and Yasunao Tone. In 2012 he was the recipient of the Foundation for Contemporary Arts, Grants to Artists Award, since 2016 he is a Chapter Associate Artist and in 2017 he received a Creative Wales Award.
 

Angharad Davies

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Angharad Davies is a violinist, one at ease in both improvising and composition, with a wide discography as part of varied range of ensembles and groups. She’s a specialist in the art of ‘preparing’ her violin, adding objects or materials to it to extend its sound making properties. Her sensitivity to the sonic possibilities of musical situations and attentiveness to their shape and direction make her one of contemporary music’s most fascinating figures. She has performed at the Queen Elizabeth Hall, Tate Modern, the Proms, Music We’d Like to Hear new music series, Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival, El Nicho festival in Mexico where she premiered Eliane Radigue’s Occam XXI for solo violin.

She is an associate artist at Cafe Oto, is a member of Cranc, Common Objects and Apartment House, been artist in residence at Q-02, and played live with Tony Conrad in the Turbine Room at the Tate Modern. Other collaborations have featured the likes of John Butcher, Steve Beresford, Laura Cannell, Daniela Cascella, Anat Ben David, Rhodri Davies, Matt Davis, Richard Dawson, Julia Eckhardt, Kazuko Hohki, Roberta Jean, Lina Lapelyte, Dominic Lash, Tisha Mukarji, Andrea Neumann, Rie Nakajima, Anie O’Dwyer, Okkuyng Lee, Tim Parkinson, J.G.Thirlwell, Silvia Tarozzi, Stefan Thut, Deborah Walker, Paul Whitty, Manfred Werder, Birgit Ulher, Taku Unami and she’s released records on Absinth Records, Another Timbre, Potlatch and Confrontrecords.
Angharad Davies recent work included as Radio 3 Late Junction album of the year: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/1kKy56yZYw6dcwtlx2hbBJy/the-late-junction-albums-of-2016

 

Ed Wright

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Edward Wright is a UK based composer who was born in Buckinghamshire in 1980 which makes him very old to some people and not all that old to others. He completed a practice based PhD in music in 2010, focusing on combining electroacoustic and instrumental forces with Professor Andrew Lewis at Bangor University.

His work is mainly focused towards the electroacoustic end of the musical spectrum although he writes for and plays ‘real’ instruments as well. Highlights include; performances overseas including mainland Europe and the U.S.A., ‘mention’ in the Prix Bourges for his piece Con-Chords, a number of classical commissions, and airplay on BBC Radio 1 and S4C television. Ed also curates the Oscilloscope concert series and performs as part of the electronic trio Accretion Entropy.

Ed lives in North Wales with Emma, their daughter Alena, and finds it very hard to write about himself in the third person.

More about Ed is here: http://www.virtual440.com/welcome

 

Jenn Kirby

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Dr. Jenn Kirby is an Irish composer, performer, software developer and academic based in Swansea, UK. Her work ranges from instrumental composition, to electroacoustic, to laptop orchestra and the performance of live electronics. Jenn’s work explores elements of theatre, humour and subversion. Jenn works as the Programme Director for Music Performance and Production at the University of Wales Trinity Saint David, where she teaches composition and music technology.

Much of Jenn’s research is focused on the performance of electronic music. The output from which includes the foundation of the Swansea Laptop Orchestra and the creation of software for new music performance, and the re-purposing of controllers and interfaces as musical performance instruments.
 
Jenn makes a very welcome return to play Listen to the Voice of Fire. Again, what to expect?! I love this photo and expect things may be wild-hope so-come and find out.

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Kitchen Cynic + Pefkin = Barrett’s Dotted Beauty

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Fantastic news update, Pefkin are transmuted to become Barrett’s Dotted Beauty for their Aberystwyth appearance.  JW myself and Ruth were all hoping that it might happen and so it has…very excited to announce…These were and are legends of the psycke underground, do yourselves a favour and come along for these, a real treat

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Barrett’s Dottled Beauty is what you get when you cross a Kitchen Cynic with a Pefkin. Nursing an obsession equally with Syd Barrett and lepidoptera, Alan Davidson and Gayle Brogan formed this duo in 2016, playing semi-improvised experimental folk, informed by their shared interest in nature, folk song and noise. “siren-esque psalms quietly stare, seduce and enchant, beguilement doesn’t begin to touch it, ghostly drone mosaics, which arrive trimmed in classicist vintage whose lineage ripples to a dawning of time whilst sonically balanced on a finite point located somewhere between the primordial psych folk utterance’s of Alphane Moon, Ghost, Our glassie Azoth and the bewitching trips of George Harrison’s ‘Blue Jay Way’. Their second album released in a limited edition of 80 in individually collaged sleeves is long sold out.

Pefkin is the alter ego of Gayle Brogan, one half of Glaswegian vintage synth duo Electroscope and ex-proprietor of the Boa Melody Bar mail order. She has been recording as Pefkin since 1999 and released albums on Morc, Wild Silence, Reverb Worship, Pseudoarcana, etc.

More recently she has been recording with the Kitchen Cynics’ Alan Davidson under the name Barrett’s Dottled Beauty, creating psych-folk hymnals inspired by a mutual love of folk songs and nature, and has been recording with United Bible Studies. On her own Gayle creates a dreamy rural psychedelia from looped vocals, guitar, analogue synth and violin and has received comparisons to Coil, Popul Vuh and Nico. She has just released a new album “Final Instar” inspired by moths on Siren Wire and an 8″ lathe cut on Sonido Polifonico.

Gayle played at last year’s Listen to the voice of Fire as part of Electroscope, and I couldn’t wait to have her back-prodigious and inspiring, slightly odd name Pefkin but come and check out this mesmerising psychedelia.

 

Exemption from meaning

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kyokusui no en

This project is supported by Daiwa Anglo Japanese Foundation and the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation .

The pitch was to make a new piece of sound work, based on the Japanese ceramics contained in the Aberystwyth University School of Art.  And to bring experimental and improvising artists together with Toshimaru Nakamura who makes his Welsh debut here in Aberystwyth in 2018-a few weeks away now!

You can see my trace here in this photo which I snapped, visiting by chance, at Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge before Christmas.  The pitch had been made at this point but there was someting very pleasing about seeing this particualar example.

Kyokusul no en i is a song reading festival conducted in Spring (currently held on the first  Sunday of March at the Dazaifu shrine), where poets compete in their skills to create an original verse before a Japanese wine-cup which has been placed over-stream passes through its strecth on a  narrow river branch.  Historically, this festival was believed to have been held by the high-court members of classical China from 300 BC as a festival to wash away the impurities of spirit.  It became popular in Japan from around the Heian period (794-1868).

This provided me with a burst of confidence in the project which would see several improvisers collaborating with Toshimaru Nakamura. Each would select an item from the collection and this be the basis of the ‘object score’.   Amongs the collaborators are: Rhodri Davies, Greg Bevan (film) Adrew Leslie Hooker, Jenn Kirby, Mary Jacob (poet), Ed Wright, Dafydd Roberts & Toshimaru Nakamura.

With a few weeks now to run each of the collaborators choose an item from the collection to work with/respond to. With a bit of luck-respondents respond speedily (albeit at short notice) collaborator items will form the basis of an exhibition at the Aberystwyth Arts Centre in March.

So the idea now is to begin to capture some words and document some of the process.

I have not decided which pot i will use, but one of the best things already has been becoming aware of just how much we have in the collections  and  its quality and diversity inspires.

I started -re reading Barthes’ Empire of Signs as a prelude to this project and even though this is not of istelf a research project, finding contexts and texts about this process is something I will try and capture as well-but as I am in haste this may all come afterwards. I come from a point of naievety so you may provide links and text that I should refer to. Especially around creating object  and graphic scores, Barthes, improvisation and sonification.